02/29/12

Bill Introduced to Help Beach Access at Cape Hatteras

In response to the National Park Service Final Rule that has new restrictions and guidelines for accessing the beaches of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina Congressman Walter B. Jones has introduced H.R. 4094. This legislation would restore reasonable pedestrian and motorized access to the Cape Hatteras National Seashore Recreational Area. The bill would overturn a final rule implemented by the National Park Service (NPS) two weeks ago, as well as the 2008 U.S. District court approved Consent Decree.

If you support this bill H.R. 4094, contact your state representatives and urge them to support it as well. The Cape Hatteras National Seashore belongs to everyone, no matter what state you are in, and your voice matters.

“The federal government needs to remember that Cape Hatteras was established to be a recreational area for the American people,” said Congressman Jones. “But taxpayers can’t recreate without access to the beach. The goal of management ought to be a balanced approach between visitor access and species protection. The Final Rule falls short of that goal. The Interim Strategy comes much closer to hitting the target.”

As part of the Final Rule, beach driving permits are required to drive on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. For information on the permit costs and related park service rules, visit Cape Hatteras Beach Driving Permits.

H.R. 4094 would reinstitute the Park Service’s 2007 Interim Management Strategy (IMS) to govern visitor access and species protection in the Recreational Area. The Interim Strategy was backed up by a 113-page Biological Opinion issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service which found that it would not jeopardize the species of concern, namely piping plover and sea turtles. H.R. 4094 has been referred to the House Natural Resources Committee for further consideration.


02/28/12

Graveyard 100 Ultra Marathon Set for March 10th

The best endurance runners in the world will be on the Outer Banks March 10th for the Graveyard 100 Ultra Marathon. The Graveyard 100 is two races: 100 miles point-to-point or 100k point-to-point. Yes, you read that correctly: 100 miles.

A portion of all entry fees will be donated to the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum to further the preservation, advancement and presentation of the maritime history and shipwrecks of the North Carolina Outer Banks

The 100 mile run extends the length of the Outer Banks and is 102.2 miles point-to-point starting “where the road begins,” and highway 12 starts at the edge of the sand in Corolla. Runners will then travel south the entire length of the paved highway on Bodie Island and the entire length of paved highway on Hatteras Island, viewing much of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore via historic Hwy 12. Runners will end at the “end of the road” on Hatteras Island adjacent to the Ocracoke Island Ferry and directly in front of the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum.

Friends and family waiting for runners to finish will be treated to special guided tours at the museum.

The 100k course starts at aid station 2 at 4pm from Bodie Island Light House, is 63 miles long and has a 19 hour cutoff. 100k runners will take a quick spur north of the lighthouse on Hwy 12 then turn and follow 100 mile runners across the 2.5 mile long Bonner Bridge spanning the Oregon Inlet between Bodie Island and Hatteras Island around sunset. The rest of the course will be identical to the 100 mile runners finishing at the “end of the road” on Hatteras Island adjacent to the Ocracoke Island Ferry and directly in front of the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum.

So far for the 2012 Graveyard 100, runners from 23 states and 3 countries are participating. The runner traveling the greatest distance to run is Al Harman from Vancouver, BC. 87% of registrants are running the 100 mile and 13% are running the 100k. The oldest runner who has signed up to participate is Louis Joline, age 79 from Lake Tapawingo, MO. The youngest runners are Karsten Olsen, from Wilton, CT and Spencer Williams from Hudson, MA, both 20 years old. The average age of the runners is 41.

For more information about the event, visit www.graveyard100.com. If you would like to volunteer, please email brandon@graveyard100.com

We welcome all the runners and their friends and families to Hatteras Island in the beautiful Outer Banks of North Carolina! Everyone at Surf or Sound Realty wishes the best of luck to all the runners!


02/24/12

Picture of the Week

This is what a Hatteras Island vacation is all about! Gathering with friends and family at the beach vacation home and enjoying fun times together, relaxing by the ocean! The best memories are made on Hatteras Island!

Photo submitted on Facebook by Laurie Holley


02/15/12

Fireworks Display May Be Returning to Hatteras Island

Hatteras and Ocracoke islands have had no fireworks displays the past two years, but that may change for this year as the local community, businesses, organizations and Park Service work together to take the necessary steps toward hosting a fireworks display in Avon village for 2012.

The reason for no displays the past two year is that, on July, 4, 2009, four pyrotechnics workers died due to a terrible explosion on Ocracoke Island when the crew was near the ferry docks in Ocracoke village unloading fireworks for the display. As a result, ew restrictions were put in place that made it very complicated and costly to continue with the fireworks displays.

Due to massive support from local officials, businesses and individuals, the Cape Hatteras National Park Service has agreed to allow a permit for the launching of fireworks off Avon Pier.

Launching fireworks from the beach is illegal, however, concessions will be made for the Fourth of July as the Avon Pier is privately owned, and the fireworks will be launched into the ocean, past the mean low-water mark, and ergo outside of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore boundary.

While there will still be permits that need to be issued, this approval basically paves the way for the annual fireworks display to proceed.

The biggest hurdle to the annual display has been cleared, but there is still a lot of work to do.

Pyrotechnico, a pyrotechnics company from Pennsylvania, will be coming to Hatteras Island for a community meeting on March 15 to meet with the council and anyone who wants to be involved.

Fundraising efforts will continue on Hatteras and Ocracoke islands to provide the necessary financial support. So far, for 2012, Avon will be hosting the only professional display. We are very excited to share this news with our vacation guests and will keep you informed of any additional information as we receive it so that you can plan for your Hatteras Island vacation!

Donations for the display can be sent to APOA, PO Box 9, Avon, NC 27915.

Checks can also be dropped off (with attn: Norm Campbell) at any of the islands’ East Carolina Bank locations.


02/7/12

150th Anniversary of the Battle of Roanoke Island

Did you know that Roanoke Island, just north of Hatteras Island, played a part in the Civil War? Drew Pullen will be hosting a free program on the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Roanoke Island on Wednesday, February 8th at 7 p.m. at the Fort Raleigh National Historic Site and Visitor Center in Manteo. The program will last about one hour and is part of the National Park Service “Know Your Park” citizen science program.

The presentation will include details on the preparation of Burnside’s Expedition, encountering of severe winter storms near Hatteras Inlet, landing of troops on Roanoke Island, assault on the Confederate 3 gun earthwork, and the consequences of this Union victory.

A former history teacher, Drew Pullen graduated from Houghton College with a major in history and is the author of two books: The Civil War On Hatteras Island and The Civil War On Roanoke Island. Drew serves on the Board of The Friends Of The Graveyard Of The Atlantic Museum, as Chair of the “Flags Over Hatteras” Civil War On The Outer Banks Committee and a volunteer at the museum.

The “Know Your Park” citizen science program series is designed to further connect the Outer Banks communities and residents with the rich natural world and cultural heritage of their neighboring National Park sites; Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Wright Brothers National Memorial and Fort Raleigh National Historic Site.


02/1/12

Beach Driving Permits – Costs Announced

The National Park Service has announced that there will be a new permitting process for Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) usage in the Cape Hatteras seashore. This rule is effective February 15, 2012.

Permits can be obtained beginning on February 15 at any of the three NPS ORV permit offices located at Coquina Beach, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Visitor Center (Buxton), and the Ocracoke Visitor Center. These offices will be open year-round, seven days a week, except Christmas Day, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with expanded hours on weekends and holidays during the summer season.

The cost of an annual permit (valid for the calendar year) is $120. A 7-day ORV permit (valid from the date issued) will cost $50.

In order to provide the public with ample time to obtain a permit, there will be a transition period between February 15 and March 15 before the rule is fully implemented and enforced. The FAQ and map is available on the Seashore’s website.

Visit this quick link to view the map of designated ORV routes: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/upload/2012-CAHA-ORV-Routes-Map-2.pdf


What does this mean for you, our vacation guests?

To drive an ORV on the beach, a permit will need to be purchased and a 7-minute video will need to be watched at any of the three NPS ORV permit offices located at Coquina Beach, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Visitor Center (Buxton), and the Ocracoke Visitor Center

One permit is necessary per vehicle someone intends to drive on the beach.

You can purchase a full year permit for $120 (calendar year) or a 7-day permit for $50 (7 days from date of purchase).

Driving will only be permitted in specified areas, and those areas are subject to closures due to “resource protection” or if the capacity limit for the area has been met. Available ORV Routes are listed on the map here: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/upload/2012-CAHA-ORV-Routes-Map-2.pdf .

The National Park Service website has been updated with FAQ and map information at http://www.nps.gov/caha


Frequently Asked Questions


Do I need a permit to operate a vehicle off road?

Yes. To obtain an ORV permit, you must complete a short education program, acknowledge in writing that you understand and agree to abide by the rules governing ORV use at the Seashore, and pay the applicable permit fee. Both weekly (7-day, valid from the date of issuance) and annual (calendar year) ORV permits will be available.


Is there a limit to the number of ORV permits available?

No. There will be no limit to the number of permits that the Superintendent could issue. However, use restrictions may limit the number of vehicles on a particular route at one time.
Several of my family members have ORVs that we would like to use on Seashore beaches.


Do we need to get a permit for each vehicle?

Yes. You will need to get a permit for each vehicle that you want to use for driving on designated ORV routes. You must display the proof of permit, in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, on each vehicle that you operate on designated ORV routes within the Seashore. (The proof of permit may be a color coded windshield sticker, hang tag for the rear-view mirror, or some other indicator provided by NPS.)


Where can I operate my vehicle off road?

Once you obtain an ORV permit, you may operate a vehicle off road only on designated routes. Maps of designated ORV routes will be available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site. For your convenience, we have copied the ORV route chart below or you can find them here: http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/upload/2012-CAHA-ORV-Routes-Map-2.pdf


Does the ORV permit guarantee that all designated ORV routes will be open for me to use?

No. In addition to the referenced seasonal restrictions, ORV routes are subject to temporary resource and safety closures. However, past experience indicates that substantial portions of the beach designated as ORV routes will remain open for ORV use even when other sections are temporarily closed.


Are there any requirements for my vehicle?

Yes. To receive a permit to operate a vehicle on designated ORV routes, your vehicle must:
Be registered, licensed, and insured for highway use and comply with inspection requirements for the state, country, or province where the vehicle is registered
Have no more than two axles and be equipped with tires that are listed or approved by the U.S. Department of Transportation as described at: http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Shoppers/Tires/Tires+Rating/Passenger+Vehicles.
Be equipped with a low-pressure tire gauge, shovel, jack, and jack support board.


Can I drive on designated ORV routes at night?

Yes, but not at all times on all routes.

From November 16 through April 30: ORVs will be allowed on designated ORV routes 24 hours a day, subject to the terms and conditions established under an ORV permit.

From May 1 through September 14: Designated ORV routes in potential sea turtle nesting habitat (ocean intertidal zone, ocean backshore, and dunes) will be closed to ORVs from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m.

From September 15 through November 15: Designated ORV routes in potential sea turtle nesting habitat (ocean intertidal zone, ocean backshore, and dunes) will remain closed to ORVs from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m., however, the Superintendent may reopen portions of designated ORV routes at night if there are no turtle nests remaining. This is a minor change to the dates in the ROD. NPS has decided it will be easier for the public to understand and more convenient to administer if the night-driving dates coincided with some of the seasonal ORV route dates. Therefore, night driving may be allowed beginning on September 15 instead of September 16. Routes that are subject to these night-driving restrictions, as well as routes or portions of routes identified as having no turtle nests remaining, will be shown on maps available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site.


Is a separate permit required for night driving?

No. It will be covered by the ORV permit required to drive on the designated ORV routes in the Seashore.


I have a family member who is disabled or mobility-impaired. Can I use my ORV to drive that family member to the beach where we are gathering, even if it is not designated as an ORV route?

Yes, if you obtain a special-use permit for that purpose. The special-use permit will allow you to transport mobility-impaired individuals to a predetermined location in a beach area in front of a village that is not otherwise open to ORV use. You will be subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the permit. Additionally, you should keep in mind that with a standard ORV permit you will have access to many miles of beach open to ORVs year-round or seasonally. In those areas, vehicles may simply be parked in the ORV corridor.


Basic Definitions

ORV corridor means the actual physical limits of the designated ORV route in the Seashore. On the landward side, the ORV corridor on Seashore beaches will be marked when possible by posts that are located seaward of the toe of the dune or the vegetation line. On the seaward side, the corridor runs to the water line, which will not be marked by posts unless necessary. Where the ocean beach is at least 30 meters wide above the high tide line, the landward side of the corridor will be posted at least 10 meters seaward of the toe of the dune.

ORV permits: ORV permits are a form of NPS special park use permits, which are issued and administered by the Superintendent and for which the NPS charges a fee to recover its administrative costs.
(i) A permit issued by the Superintendent is required to operate a vehicle on designated ORV routes at the Seashore.
(ii) Operation of a motor vehicle authorized under an ORV permit is limited to those routes designated in the ORV routes chart.
(iii) There is no limit to the number of ORV permits that the Superintendent may issue.
(iv) Annual ORV permits are valid for the calendar year for which they are issued. Seven-day ORV permits are valid from the date of issue.
(v) In order to obtain a permit, an applicant must comply with vehicle and equipment requirements, complete a short education program in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, acknowledge in writing an understanding of the rules governing ORV use at the Seashore, and pay the permit fee.
(vi) Each permit holder must affix the proof of permit, in a manner and location specified by the Superintendent, to the vehicle covered by the permit for use off-road.

ORV ROUTES:
The following ramps are designated for off-road use to provide access to ocean beaches: 2.5, 4, 23, 25.5, 27, 30, 32.5, 34, 38, 43, 44, 47.5, 49, 55, 59, 59.5, 63, 67, 68, 70, and 72.

Designated ORV routes and ramps are subject to resource, safety, seasonal, and other closures.
Soundside ORV access ramps are described below.

For a village beach to be open to ORV use during the winter season, it must be at least 20 meters (66 feet) wide from the toe of the dune seaward to mean high tide line. Maps showing designated routes and ramps will be available in the Office of the Superintendent and on the Seashore Web site.

BODIE ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND: Ramp 2.5 (0.5 miles south of the southern boundary of Coquina Beach) to 0.2 miles south of ramp 4.

SEASONAL (September 15 to March 14): 0.2 miles south of ramp 4 to the eastern confluence of the Atlantic Ocean and Oregon Inlet.

HATTERAS ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND:
1.5 miles south of ramp 23 to ramp 27.
Ramp 30 to ramp 32.5.

The following soundside ORV access routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound between the villages of Salvo and Avon: soundside ramps 46, 48, 52, 53, 54 and the soundside ORV access at Little Kinnakeet.
Ramp 38 to 1.5 miles south of ramp 38.

The following soundside ORV access routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound between the villages of Avon and Buxton: soundside ramps 57, 58, 59, and 60.
0.4 miles north of ramp 43 to Cape Point to 0.3 miles west of “the hook.”
Interdunal route from intersection with Lighthouse Road (i.e., ramp 44) to ramp 49, with one spur route from the interdunal route to the ORV route below.
Ramp 47.5 to east Frisco boundary.

A soundside ORV access route from Museum Drive to Pamlico Sound near Coast Guard Station Hatteras Inlet.
Pole Road from Museum Drive to Spur Road to Pamlico Sound, with one spur route, commonly known as Cable Crossing, to Pamlico Sound and four spur routes to the ORV route below.
Ramp 55 southwest along the ocean beach for 1.6 miles, ending at the intersection with the route commonly known as Bone Road.

SEASONAL (November 1 to March 31):
0.1 mile south of Rodanthe Pier to ramp 23.
Ramp 34 to ramp 38 (Avon).
East Frisco boundary to west Frisco boundary (Frisco village beach).
East Hatteras boundary to ramp 55 (Hatteras village beach).

OCRACOKE ISLAND–DESIGNATED ROUTES

YEAR ROUND:
Ramp 59 to ramp 63. After ramp 59.5 is constructed, it will replace ramp 59 for ORV access and the route will be from ramp 59.5 to ramp 63.
Three routes from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound located north of the Pony Pens, commonly known as Prong Road, Barrow Pit Road, and Scrag Cedar Road.
1.0 mile northeast of ramp 67 to 0.5 mile northeast of ramp 68.
A route from NC Highway 12 to Pamlico Sound located near Ocracoke Campground, commonly known as Dump Station Road.
0.4 miles northeast of ramp 70 to Ocracoke inlet.
A route from ramp 72 to a pedestrian trail to Pamlico Sound, commonly known as Shirley’s Lane.

SEASONAL (September 15 to March 14): A seasonal route 0.6 mile south of ramp 72 from the beach route to a pedestrian trail to Pamlico Sound.
A seasonal route at the north end of South Point spit from the beach route to Pamlico Sound.
November 1 to March 31 0.5 mile northeast of ramp 68 to ramp 68 (Ocracoke Campground area).