08/27/13

Where Did the Name "Salvo" Come From?

Hatteras Island History – Where Did the Name “Salvo” Come From?

The Hatteras Island Village of Salvo has recently been featured by HamptonRoads.com as part of its “What’s in a Name” series. The story overviews Salvo’s role in the U.S. Civil War and how the events of the time caused this seaside village to earn its name.

In October 1861, Confederate troops tried to retake Hatteras Island by attacking a Union regiment which was based near where the village of Salvo is today. As the skirmishes went back and forth, in what was called the “Chicamacomico Races”, the Union positioned the ship Monticello near the coast and set to bombing the Confederate forces on Hatteras Island. According to Hatteras historian Danny Couch, the ship’s captain instructed his deck officer to “Give them one more salvo for good measure” as the Union ship was departing. (A “salvo” is a simultaneous discharge of weapons, bombs, or cannons.) According to several accounts, the Union did not have an official name for the area being bombed, so it become known as Salvo after the Union captain’s departing order.

Salvo was officially recognized by the federal government in 1901 with a new post office, which remained open until 1992. Salvo is one of the seven villages that is part of Hatteras Island.

Read the complete story, “What’s in a Name? Salvo, NC“.

 

This old post office in Salvo, N.C., was used through the early 1990s.
(Steve Earley | The Virginian-Pilot)

 


08/19/13

Cape Hatteras National Seashore Featured on CNN.com

Cape Hatteras National Seashore has recently been featured on CNN.com’s weekly “Summer in the Park” Series. The series spotlights the country’s most popular national parks and gives insider recommendations from park rangers.

CNN interviewed Patrick Gamman, the district interpretive ranger for Cape Hatteras National Seashore, who revealed his favorite things to see and do. If you come for a day, don’t miss the seashell hunting, touring a lighthouse, or watching the sunset over the Pamlico Sound. Ranger Gamman’s “Favorite less-travelled spot” at the Seashore is visiting the beach at nighttime to stargaze and watch ghost crabs. He also recommended a favorite spot to view wildlife, as well as answered several interesting questions including “Moment that made him smile”, “Oddest Moment in the Park”, and “A Ranger’s Request”. To find out what Ranger Gamman recommends, read the entire story on CNN.com’s website, “Life is a beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore“.

Cape Hatteras National Seashore was established in 1953 as the nation’s first national seashore. It encompasses over 70 miles of coastline along the Atlantic Ocean from Nags Head to Ocracoke Island. For more information on the Seashore, click here.


Cape Hatteras Lighthouse
Photo Credit:
National Park Service


08/12/13

Hatteras Site Added to National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom

A site on Hatteras Island, which served as a safe haven for hundreds of runaway slaves during the Civil War, has been added to the National Park Services’ Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.

Hotel De Afrique housed freed slaves from North and South Carolina during the period of 1861 and 1865 after the Union forces defeated the Confederate forces at Hatteras Inlet and at Forts Clark and Hatteras. The freed slaves helped Union forces build ships and fortify forts in exchange for housing and food. The original site of Hotel De Afrique has disappeared due to erosion and flooding.

A monument commemorating Hotel De Afrique and Hatteras’ participation in the National Underground Railroad was dedicated in late July during a ceremony held at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras. The monument is located at the entrance to the museum.

Remember to include a visit to the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum while you are here. The museum offers a unique view of Hatteras’ maritime and Civil war history. For information on the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, click here or call 252-986-2995.