08/27/13

Where Did the Name "Salvo" Come From?

Hatteras Island History – Where Did the Name “Salvo” Come From?

The Hatteras Island Village of Salvo has recently been featured by HamptonRoads.com as part of its “What’s in a Name” series. The story overviews Salvo’s role in the U.S. Civil War and how the events of the time caused this seaside village to earn its name.

In October 1861, Confederate troops tried to retake Hatteras Island by attacking a Union regiment which was based near where the village of Salvo is today. As the skirmishes went back and forth, in what was called the “Chicamacomico Races”, the Union positioned the ship Monticello near the coast and set to bombing the Confederate forces on Hatteras Island. According to Hatteras historian Danny Couch, the ship’s captain instructed his deck officer to “Give them one more salvo for good measure” as the Union ship was departing. (A “salvo” is a simultaneous discharge of weapons, bombs, or cannons.) According to several accounts, the Union did not have an official name for the area being bombed, so it become known as Salvo after the Union captain’s departing order.

Salvo was officially recognized by the federal government in 1901 with a new post office, which remained open until 1992. Salvo is one of the seven villages that is part of Hatteras Island.

Read the complete story, “What’s in a Name? Salvo, NC“.

 

This old post office in Salvo, N.C., was used through the early 1990s.
(Steve Earley | The Virginian-Pilot)

 


08/12/13

Hatteras Site Added to National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom

A site on Hatteras Island, which served as a safe haven for hundreds of runaway slaves during the Civil War, has been added to the National Park Services’ Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.

Hotel De Afrique housed freed slaves from North and South Carolina during the period of 1861 and 1865 after the Union forces defeated the Confederate forces at Hatteras Inlet and at Forts Clark and Hatteras. The freed slaves helped Union forces build ships and fortify forts in exchange for housing and food. The original site of Hotel De Afrique has disappeared due to erosion and flooding.

A monument commemorating Hotel De Afrique and Hatteras’ participation in the National Underground Railroad was dedicated in late July during a ceremony held at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras. The monument is located at the entrance to the museum.

Remember to include a visit to the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum while you are here. The museum offers a unique view of Hatteras’ maritime and Civil war history. For information on the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, click here or call 252-986-2995.


04/1/13

Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station Opens for 2013 Season

Today, April 1st, marks the opening day of the 2013 season at Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station, the first operational life-saving station in North Carolina! Located in Rodanthe, NC, Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station and Historic Site is the scene of the most highly-awarded maritime rescue in American history, the SS Mirlo! You’ll have a chance to tour one of the few USLSS sites in the nation with all of its original builidings, including the 1874 Life-Saving Station, the Drill Pole, the 1892 Cook House, the 1907 Midgett House, the 1911 Cook House, the 1911 Life-Saving Station, and the 1911 Horse Stable. It’s the largest, most complete USLSS complex in the nation and 1 of only 2 1874 USLSS stations in the nation open to the public.

The complex is open Monday-Friday, 10am to 5pm for self-guided tours. Admission is $6 per person or $4 for seniors (65+) and students. Be sure to check out the Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station Calendar of Events for Summer Porch Program dates, the Beach Apparatus Drill, and American Heroes Day!

The Chicamacomico Historical Association is a private, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to restore, preserve and interpret the buildings and history of Chicamacomico Life- Saving Station, as well as the U.S. Life-Saving Service and its successor, the U.S. Coast Guard on the Outer Banks. The Association owns and operates the museum site and the museum shop and raises its own funds. 100% of all admission fees, gift shop purchases, memberships, and donations go directly to the preservation, restoration, and operation of this historic site.


02/24/13

Stroll Down Memory Lane at the Outer Banks History Center

Located in Manteo within the Roanoke Island Festival Park complex is the Outer Banks History Center, a true gem for anyone who reserves a special place in their heart for the Outer Banks. The center came to fruition in 1986 when local writer and historian, David Stick, author of Graveyard of the Atlantic: Shipwrecks of the North Carolina Coast and several other works, donated his personal library and research materials to the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

The History Center is home to many collections including manuscripts, maps, photographs, books, personal and organizational papers, natural history, environmental sciences and so much more. Spend a day in the reading and reference room of the center where you have access to several worktables, an online catalog, audio-visual equipment, a microfilm reader-printer, and a photocopier. Each year the center responds to thousands of research requests from the general public to national media outlets, such as the History Channel, so contact them today!

During your upcoming vacation, make plans to attend the exhibit, “Dare County in the 1930s: Decade of Determination,” starting March 1st and running through October 14th!

The History Center is open Monday-Friday from 9am-5pm (excluding state holidays and weather emergencies) and be sure to visit the Outer Banks History Center Gallery 7 days a week from 9am-5pm. (Check with Roanoke Island Festival Park for up-to-date information and hours concerning the gallery).

Visit the Outer Banks History Center for a true understanding of the Outer Banks culture and its people!


02/21/13

Not just another day at sea…

On February 21, 1854, a 250-ton barkentine, Orline St. John, was dismasted in a strong gale off of Cape Hatteras. As heavy seas battered the large vessel and its crew, many people tried to seek refuge out of harms way. Concerned with their safety, several crew members tied themselves to the rigging in hopes of not being swept overboard. After the storm passed, the crew was left to fend for themselves for about 10 days before they were rescued. Unfortunately, four crew members did not return home.

Barkentine : a sailing ship of three of more masts with the foremast square-rigged and the others fore-and-aft rigged


02/12/13

Shipwrecks…UNCOVERED

It’s that time of year again! Days on end of a strong “blow”, as native islanders would call it, tends to expose treasures that have remained hidden from the salty elements for many years. Whether you are in search of miles of phenomenal shelling, a scattering of sea glass, or treasures washed ashore from shipwrecks of yore, the beaches of Hatteras Island are the place to be!

The waters that surround our barrier island are known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic due to the convergence of two strong ocean currents, the Labrador and the Gulf Stream, as well as the treacherous, ever-changing Diamond Shoals. Thousands of ill-fated boats and their crews are said to have been lost near Cape Hatteras. Other factors leading to the grim total of ships lost to sea were the Civil War, German submarine attacks, as well as pirate attacks.

Many shipwrecks have found their home on the sea floor but there are a few that have been laid to rest on our shores. These mysterious pieces of maritime history can occasionally be seen as the sand shifts to uncover these treasures.

Take some time to treasure hunt while you’re here and see if you can locate one or more of the following shipwrecks on Hatteras Island:

Oriental 1862
Located seven miles south of Oregon Inlet campground or 30 miles north of Buxton. Park at Pea Island Comfort Station. Wooden remains are occasionally exposed, as well as a wooden bow which is located on the beach 1 mile north.

G.A. Kohler 1933
Located off of Ramp #27 on the beach.

Altoona 1878
Turn down Lighthouse Road in Buxton. Follow the road 1.7 miles to its end in the gravel parking lot. Walk over the ramp to the beach, then south along the beach 1/2 miles and west 1/4 mile to the bow of the Altoona.

The Pocahontas
Look for the parking area on the east side of NC Hwy 12, just south of the last building on the south end of Salvo, and 4/10 mile south of mile marker 43. The visible part of the wreck can be seen in the surf at high or low tide, but more is visible during low tide.

For more information on maritime history, be sure to visit the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras!


11/28/12

Outer Banks Maritime Heritage Trail

Take a journey along Highway 12 and explore the dynamic marine environment and get a sense of how it has shaped the Island and the people who have called this sandbar home for centuries.

Click here to watch videos, view photos, and listen to stories shared by Outer Banks natives.

Happy Trails!


10/22/12

U. S. Coast Guard to perform Historic Breeches Buoy Reenactment

This Thursday, October 25 at 2pm, the USCG will perform the Historic Breeches Buoy Reenactment in a special post-season beach apparatus drill. The demonstration will be held at the Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station and Museum in Rodanthe and will begin promptly at 2pm. Please allow plenty of time to park, get tickets, and get to the program start area. Admission is $6 for adults and $4 for seniors (62+) or youth (6-17).

For more information, call 252-987-1552.


08/13/12

Meet the "Real" Taffy

Have you ever heard of the wildly popular book, Taffy of Torpedo Junction? If not, you are missing a real Carolina treat!
This fictional novel recounts the daring antics of 13-year old Taffy Willis during World War II on Hatteras Island. You will be swept along on a thrilling adventure with Taffy as she experiences life on a small sandbar during wartime.

“Taffy” is based on the real-life, Carol Dillion, a Hatteras Island native.

Join Carol on August 22 or 29th at 2pm at the Chicamacomico Lifesaving Station in Rodanthe to learn more about her exhilarating adventures! Prepare to be enthralled by her tales of “Taffy.” You’ll find out how much of the novel was fiction and how much was actually fact!
Stop by Buxton Village Books to get your copy of the book today or order online, so that you’ll be able to throughly discuss the details with Carol on Wednesday! This is a great read for all ages!


06/13/12

Graveyard of the Atlantic Summer Programs

AHOY MATEY! The Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras is offering a plethora of weekly summer programs and activities for all ages! It would be a pity to miss out on this amazing opportunity to explore and discover more about our maritime heritage.
Here’s a list of programs that you may be interested in attending…
Monday-Saturday 1st Mates Program
-For ages 8-12. Children will receive a certificate of rank and 1st mate’s wristband by doing a Museum search and attending two programs, or doing a Museum search, attending one program, and completing one written activity.
Monday and Fridays
Maritime Movies @ 11am and 2pm

-These shows include information about the U-85, Chicamacomico, the Alligator, the Battle of the Atlantic and more!
Tuesdays @ 2
-A speaker’s series on the people and events that shape our island’s history.
Wednesdays
Island Treasures @ 11am

-Talks and demonstrations related to or island’s heritage.
Civil War Mini Talks @ 3pm
Thursdays
Children’s Nautical Crafts @ 10:30-12pm

Canvasback Decoys @ 12-4pm
-Visit with a local decoy maker, Sam Green, as he demonstrates the art of creating various decoys.
2nd Saturday
-Come down to the Museum on the 2nd Saturday of the month and see what it’s all about!
Well shiver me timbers! I think the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum is the place to be this summer!
The Museum is open Monday-Saturday from 10am until 4pm.